for the journey, not the message

Posts tagged “boat

Crackington Haven, North Cornwall

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British Cycling Expedition – 1st Google Map Adventure

In the summer after college had finished, I as most students do, had far too much spare time. I found myself spending hours on google maps, looking at all the incredible places in the world. I found patterns  which are so alien to anything we see in the UK, that they inspire a new way of thinking about travel (take a look at the area around the Kara Sea). One which addresses modern age technology, and seeks to use it as a inspirational tool . This lead me onto another set of adventures, the Google Map Adventures, In which I would look for a natural point where a journey was at the B part of A to B, and go there.

For this trip, I looked at the southern tip of Italy, Reggio di Calabria. I left it at the back of my mind while I travelled around some of the rest of the world (much of which is documented earlier in LongTimeSpent). But last summer, this idea came into fruition. Laura, whom I met at University, had a family home in Malta, and so I decided to extend the trip onto Sicily and then across the Mediterranean  to little island of Malta.

So in the olympic summer of 2012, one of my best friends, Louis, and I went on a cycling trip. Naturally I took my camera along for the ride, and Louis, brought a guitar… which he strapped on the back of his bicycle. We aimed to only spend money on food, and drink, and vowed NEVER to push our bikes. (this resulted me walking probably less than a kilometre that month, most of which was around supermarkets.)

Initially we aimed to cover 100 miles per day (the London to Brighton bike ride is 56 miles) but we probably averaged 90 miles, and only reached 100 a few.

Our route would take us through France, Germany , Switzerland, Liechtenstein (if we’re counting), back into Switzerland, Italy (the Vatican City…again if we’re counting), Sicily, and then Malta

I’ve posted a few of the photos below, and will write a little description below each. This is a pretty long post, with lots of photos, so please bear with it and let them load, I hope it’ll be worth the wait.

Relaxing After Day One on the bikesStopping off in a (seemingly) ghost town, for dinner from a pizza van after day one of riding. We almost got as far as Paris, and were very proud of ourselves.

libertie egalitie fraternity

We passed through so many idyllic french villages, which you don’t get to see when travelling any other way, and its a real pleasure. “Liberté, égalité, fraternité”

Enjoying the view in Zurich

a bit of a skip in the Journey here, this is the bridge in Zurich, Switzerland. In northern France, around the Alsasce region however, there were some beautiful golden evenings sunshine which I will never forget. The way the sunlight reflected off the corn was surreally enchanting.
Having a much needed wash in Lake Walensee

The stunning Lake Walensee, we followed a line of lakes down from Zurich while approaching the Alps, these proved a good spot for taking much needed washes, and the icy water would sooth our muscles

Sunset over Lake Walensee, Switzerland

A well earned sunset

Morning Lake Walensee

This was our camp spot, free of course, and incredibly peaceful.

Why not go to Liechtenstein?

Liechtenstein, a pointless goal in the trip, and a kind of mental halfway point, even though it was less than a third of the way!

Cunter

Just about to start our highest climb of the trip, and it was clearly going to be a ….

Camping Halfway up the Alps

Another free camping spot, halfway up the Alps. We hadn’t carried any food with up except 5 biscuits, and Louis had ‘accidentally’ eaten 3, leaving me with a mountain to cycle up and only 2 biscuits for fuel. But it rained and the wind blew like a hurricane that night, repeatedly pulling the pegs out of our tent and blowing our things away, which Louis fetched, and so redeemed himself.

Alpine Dam

Clouds looming

Top of the Julier Pass

At the top of the Julier Pass (about 50km from bottom to top, and reaching 12%), feeling very smug as the only cyclists amongst a bunch of lazy motorcycle tourists… Until a man pulling his kid in a cart behind his bicycle reached the top.
It's all downhill from here

If you’re lucky enough to have ever felt that feeling where you know everything is going to be easy, and ‘downhill from here’. That is the precise feeling I had when I began rolling down this road. literally hours of freewheeling followed.
Goodbye Switzerland

some nice Swiss scenes

Into Italy

and the border to Italy… still not the end of the freewheeling yet, got a good hour or so of that left.Lake Como

and finally at Lake Como, just in time to watch the sun go down, and pull open a bottle of red. The next day took us through some of Nothern Italy’s flatland which was dull, but we powered through it and achieved our longest distance day.

Passo Della RaticosaAnd over the Apennine mountains which run the length of Italy, these actually seemed harder to ride over than the Alps, there was a heatwave with temperatures over 41 celsius, thats 105 fahrenheit. But the pleasures of a sunny Tuscany would soon follow.

IMG_6411Little compares to cycling in Tuscany.

IMG_6416Getting some shade and looking for a route at a petrol station. (no need for refueling)

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My Stallion, the Mercian, this was a bike hand built for my Dad, he had cycled it to Venice, and around Sri Lanka.
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One of the best camp spots of the trip, just off a sheltered holiday community beach south of Naples. After a party, at which we hadn’t yet worked out that everyone knew everyone (apart from us) we became quite notorious.
IMG_6446Mozzarella and Salami Shop

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Stopping for a rest on the Amalfi coast, which has to be one of the most pleasurable, and toughest coasts to cycle.

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I had been here a few times on holiday before, but this time It felt the best.
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Louis finally managed to get the Guitar out. While cooking up dinner (half a kilo of pasta and tomato sauce…again!) on the promenade we managed to confuse an Italian policewoman to turn a blind eye to us cooking there. A compromise of moving our pans slightly to the left was drawn up, and she left.

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Torrential rain is never welcome when you have very little places to keep dry.

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With nowhere to pitch up for the night, and it being in complete darkness, we found a lime grove to set up in. Mud would be an understatement. If ‘Stuck-in-the-Mud’ was to be played in real mud, rather than a school playground, this is the mud they would use. We spent 2 hours in the morning cleaning it off everything.
IMG_6603Avola Antica mountain goat.

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Avola Antica, the ‘Grand Canyon’ of Sicily.
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Noto, the whole town was buildings like this, nothing modern, and it was incredible.

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In the sea on the last day before catching the ferry to Malta! We had about 10km to cycle, very little indeed. So we ended up falling asleep on the beach. We had both burnt in some very distinct tan lines, and so I fell asleep naked in an effort to even them up… much to the dismay of an Italian family.

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Cliff Jumping in MaltaIMG_6732

Relaxing on the yacht. A photo which always makes me feel fat now.
IMG_6750Louis and I took the dinghy out, and it ran out of petrol, so we had to paddle the whole way back… possibly the only upper body exercise we got that month…

I hope you enjoy the photos, and thanks for getting all the way to the bottom! If you have any questions please do ask!


Two from Brighton

It has been too long since my last visit here, it’s ben almost a year since my last post, and at first, as the months drew out I felt almost guilty over my lack of long-term commitment to it. I can blame it on my studies, or lack of digital camera (grumble), but to tell the truth, I just haven’t been getting myself out there. It’s been a long winter in London, and I haven’t been exploring as much as I should.

So here  are a few photos of Brighton, well Hove actually… One in the summer, and one from the winter.

I hope everyone has endured, and is now looking forward to the summer we are about to receive.

waddle on the promenade


St Tropez

Summer has started, I’m finally out of England once more, and you might notice that’s a film camera slung over my shoulder, so there will be more photos coming… as soon as they’re developed.

I’m spending a few weeks on the Cote d’Azur, and then I’m off on a grand cycling tour I may have mentioned previously. Keep posted for photos, and have a great summer.


Boat on the horizon

I returned to Brighton for a couple of days over my Easter break, after a heavy night out with some of my friends we awoke to a day which was surreally calm, we were all feeling a little worse for wear and the weather suited the mood perfectly. We walked along the seafront to town to get some breakfast at a pace which would make the most elderly of tortoises look like Usain Bolt. Even the sea couldn’t muster the energy to form a wave. There was no wind, yet a single yacht sat on the horizon.


Lands End and Back

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My best friend Louis and I went on a drive to Lands End a While back as I mentioned in one of my first posts ‘Lands End, England’. We just decided to hop in the VW and head off. As the months move on in London, my thoughts for plans this summer are becoming ever more relevant, and taking action to make them happen is getting more exciting. Louis and I are heading off on another trip this summer. This time the VW is staying behind, and we’ll be taking up our bicycles for a cycle ride. destination Sicily. Cycling is something I’ve always been interested in, and this summer it’s time to embark on my first super-long-distance ride.

English Channel 2

Arriving on the North coast of France at Calais the sun glared down and gave the peaks of the waves a beautiful definition, the light was almost blinding but brought a welcome heat from the chilly sea breeze. It felt good to be abroad again.


Lakeside, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

I had caught the bus from Siem Reap, Cambodia, to the Capital, Phnom Penh. One of my shoes had broken, so now I was walking around barefoot, with size 12 feet (UK) it had been particularly difficult to find anything new, however I’m quite sure that the barefoot look made haggling for a lower price a little easier. Two girls I had met in Siem Reap recommended a guesthouse I could stay in when I arrived in Phnom Penh.

The lake had been sold to the Koreans, and there plans had been made to build a new Central Business District for the country on the filled in remains. What had once been a beautiful, though man-made lake was now a desolate, mellow place. An atmosphere hung in the air, local men came in the daytime and chainsawed the last remaining palm trees down, and the women came round with old cement sacks to pick up the litter. I rented a motorbike for the two weeks I spent there, riding around the city every hour of the day, this city constantly surprised me. One night, around 3am, I went for a drive, after an hour of driving I had become completely lost. The streets were dark and silent. The traffic lights are turned off at night, making junctions quite a bit more thrilling. I came across a huge market in the middle of a residential area, in the dark of the night thousands of people were shopping for their groceries, people spoke in hushed voices, and no lights lit the piles of vegetable on the streets. I wished I had my camera, to photograph this surreal moment.

I found my way back to Lakeside, and watched the sunrise (as I had done for the previous five nights). The lights from a nearby government building lit the sky with a purple haze, a sight too good to sleep through.

This was the place I stayed for the longest on my travels, I had become mesmerised by the tension in the air, constantly something big felt like it was going to happen. Eventually I told myself I had to go to Vietnam, and continue on my journey.


Thailand Gallery – Set 2

On my first day in Thailand I forked out the same amount of money as I spent in two months in India, and all I got was a couple of Visas, and a Scuba Diving course. I had mixed apprehensions about the whole ordeal after my first few hours in Bangkok, most of which had been spent asleep in the back of a taxi cab, and later passed out on the bed of my seemingly luxurious hotel room after 85hrs (yes thats Eighty Five) in the lowest class of a train crossing India.

Koh Tao bounced in front of me as the ‘high-speed’ catamaran pulled into the dock. I had arrived on one of those Thai islands which are famed for their perfect white sand beaches, clear blue water, and excellently cheap diving qualifications. I had been promised a week in paradise.

While the diving was excellent, and the group course turned into private lessons seeing as nobody else had booked up, the looming full moon lay just a few days away, and travelling in a duo meant I had compromises to make. Don’t get me wrong, I do love to party, I started clubbing almost half a decade before I was of a legal age, but when the party is 10,000 morons on a beach, i’d rather be counted out.

I went nonetheless, it was everything I had expected and more (and worse). So I was glad to get back on Koh Tao and continue the Scuba course. I love the sea, I live a stones throw away from it in Brighton. So spending hours on a boat, and seeing what lies in the ocean was a dream.

 


Four Thousand Islands, Laos

After four months of rushing around the world I found myself in the south of Laos, and I was in desperate need of a bit of relaxation. I had just met these two awesome guys from Liverpool, Jamie and Mike, and they were heading for the Four Thousand Islands, in the Mekong River, Laos. I was in Pakse, I had to meet somebody there, but the town had little going for it, and the guys thankfully persuaded me to go with them, a move which turned out to be probably one of the best I made on my travels. We arrived at the port to get to the Islands after a three hour ride in the back of a pick up truck, our bags being drenched with rain from the impending monsoon, and the three of us had made the mistake of bringing absolutely no money with us, well I think at the time I had the Laos equivalent of twenty something pence. After a few hours of speaking to confused locals, we managed to scrape enough cash together to afford the boat fare to the islands, where there was apparently some dodgy guy with a card machine who was willing to give us cash. We took the chance and went for it. Paradise awaited us on the other side. The weather cleared up the next day, perfect blue skies all day, and sunsets which left the most manly of men gasping for breath. I fell in love with this place, and it’s somewhere i’ve promised myself i’ll go back to. After a week Jamie and Mike had to move on, I stayed a few more days, my camera had decided to recover from serious salt water damage it had picked up in Noosa, Australia, and I wanted to take photos.

These photos don’t do the place justice, I almost feel bad posting them. This place is Paradise. All the photos were taken with a 18-55mm kit lens, damn I needed a wide angle and marco lens with me!


English Channel Watercolour

Living on the South Coast of England affords its luxuries, hopping over to France being one of them, with the price of train travel within the UK ridiculously high its now cheaper to cross the English Channel for a day out than it is to go up to London (although I do live in London now). This photo was taken the first day of my travels around Europe, and shows, I feel, the complete contrast between my post ‘Vietnamese Festival’ which depicts the busyness, vibrancy, and madness of life in Asia against the more subdued English charms of bleak colours, grey skies, white cliffs, and our beautiful rolling hills. England, and the rest of northern Europe, for me, has a watercolour feel.