for the journey, not the message

Posts tagged “fly

The clouds come in over Tian Shan

 

I dug up some more photos from Tian Shan, The first shows the clouds coming in the evening before we left the mountains and retreated back to the city. The second is of the man who invited us into his yurt to keep dry out of the rain.

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Tian Shan, China

With the billion or so people in China, I needed to get away and have some peace and quiet, and what better way to do so than with a camping trip. A 4,600 kilometre, 2 and a half day, train ride from Shenzhen took Shane and I to the north-western Chinese city of Urumqi. This was pretty much the end of the line, a city where the communist hammer and sickle is displayed proudly, and the buildings are grey concrete blocks. Surprisingly KFC had still made its way here, but at least they had given it the address of 666.

We persuaded a hotel to let us leave all our belongings in a box in their storage room, stupidly I had sent all my camping gear home a couple of days previously, so this would be a rough and ready trip. I bought a length of rope from a local DIY store, and “borrowed” a bed sheet from the hotel which I could fashion into a hammock. We filled our back packs with tins of food, and some sausages from the supermarket in town, and caught a bus as close to Tian Shan (Heaven Mountains) as we could get. Immediately after getting of the bus a man offered to drive us further into the mountains, by this point we had learnt that westerners seemed to be some kind of prize in China, as everyone wanted to do everything for us. Chinese people are bloody brilliant.

There turned out to be the Xinjiang Camping Competition happening that weekend, and we got waved through all security like VIPs without paying any fees to enter the mountains, another stroke of luck for two almost broke travellers. The competitors had to camp at the bottom of the mountains guarded by what seemed like an army of police (I think it may have been the army) complete with riot vans. Shane and I hiked our gear to the top of the mountain before returning for the evening festivities we had been invited to. We had become hardened drinkers by this point, so the news of a beer drinking competition excited us no end. But first some of our new Chinese friends were insisting to get us wasted on rice-wine over dinner. Shane won the the first round of the competition, earning him the title píjiǔ wang (啤酒王 – Beer King). We both advanced to the final, where I managed to quaff three 600ml bottles in just over 2 minutes, winning a crate of beer which I promptly gave away due to feeling I was about to pop and not wanting more beer. The locals stood no chance!

 

Night had come, and in a drunken state we retreated back up the mountain to find our camp site, which was hidden in the trees. With only our phones for light this proved to be quite a challenge. I was ready to give up and sleep on a rock on the top of the mountain, but Shane being well versed in finding his way through trees was determined not to give up and eventually found us back to our camp. I fell asleep in my makeshift hammock straight away, and woke up shivering, after what has to be the coldest night I’ve ever experienced. We swiftly collected some dry moss and twigs together and built a fire to warm our frozen skin.

Each day we walked across the ridge of the mountain further away and set up camp further afield. Incredible peaks went on for as far as the eye could see. The air was distinctly un-Chinese in it’s lack of smog. Eagles flew overhead. In the knowledge that I would be heading home in ten days, this felt like a perfect way to draw my travels to an end.

Determined not to freeze to death, and armed with a Pocket Swiss-Army knife, we set up our second camp and proceed to cut down a dead tree with the tiny saw blade. This took hours and hours and hours. But eventually we had a fire which successfully lasted through the night. We speared a couple of sausages on sticks, roasted them over the fire, sang about our worldly conquests and hummed away on a harmonica. This is the life.

After five days, the weather turned worse, torrential rain poured down, our food had run out, and my hammock had ripped so badly I was practically sleeping on the soggy ground, so we decided to head back to Urumqi. Soaked to our bones we set off back to the bottom of the mountains when some local Uyghur people ran out calling us into their yurt. they stripped us down and dried our clothes over a cow pat fuelled stove while we waited for the rain to subside. They fed us some offish kind Naan bread (which apparently originated there) and what must have been yak butter. Delicious….

Two chinese guys happened to be also in the yurt, and they happened to be going back to Urumqi. Much to our surprise they had managed to order a taxi to drive up the mountains to come and collect them. I thought this must be from the road at the very bottom of the mountains, but no, the taxi had driven up the mountain in the rain and came right to the door of the yurt. All in all this is going to be a pretty hard camping trip to beat, and it proved to be a successful remedy to the hustle and bustle of city living.


Lands End and Back

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My best friend Louis and I went on a drive to Lands End a While back as I mentioned in one of my first posts ‘Lands End, England’. We just decided to hop in the VW and head off. As the months move on in London, my thoughts for plans this summer are becoming ever more relevant, and taking action to make them happen is getting more exciting. Louis and I are heading off on another trip this summer. This time the VW is staying behind, and we’ll be taking up our bicycles for a cycle ride. destination Sicily. Cycling is something I’ve always been interested in, and this summer it’s time to embark on my first super-long-distance ride.

Bird Triptych

I had bought a little nifty fifty, f/1.8 lens from a camera shop near Central Market, Phnom Penh. One night on the lake chilling out with some friends, I took a few snaps of a bird on a pole, they don’t show the technical quality of the new lens I had bought, but I quite like this photo series.

Just a quick and easy post today, I’ve got so much University work to get on with, and this Financial Mathematics is driving me nuts! A little retail therapy this morning sent the week off to a good start though, i’ll soon be the proud owner of a sweet Manfrotto tripod, and some new (super-expensive) batteries for my flash came just now too. You know you’re a camera geek when getting new batteries becomes exciting.

This post is dedicated to DouDou at http://doudoubirds.wordpress.com/ for nominating me for the Versatile Blogger Award, i’d also like to thank http://ayearwithhorses.wordpress.com/2012/01/12/touched/ for nominating me a while back.


Four Thousand Islands, Laos

After four months of rushing around the world I found myself in the south of Laos, and I was in desperate need of a bit of relaxation. I had just met these two awesome guys from Liverpool, Jamie and Mike, and they were heading for the Four Thousand Islands, in the Mekong River, Laos. I was in Pakse, I had to meet somebody there, but the town had little going for it, and the guys thankfully persuaded me to go with them, a move which turned out to be probably one of the best I made on my travels. We arrived at the port to get to the Islands after a three hour ride in the back of a pick up truck, our bags being drenched with rain from the impending monsoon, and the three of us had made the mistake of bringing absolutely no money with us, well I think at the time I had the Laos equivalent of twenty something pence. After a few hours of speaking to confused locals, we managed to scrape enough cash together to afford the boat fare to the islands, where there was apparently some dodgy guy with a card machine who was willing to give us cash. We took the chance and went for it. Paradise awaited us on the other side. The weather cleared up the next day, perfect blue skies all day, and sunsets which left the most manly of men gasping for breath. I fell in love with this place, and it’s somewhere i’ve promised myself i’ll go back to. After a week Jamie and Mike had to move on, I stayed a few more days, my camera had decided to recover from serious salt water damage it had picked up in Noosa, Australia, and I wanted to take photos.

These photos don’t do the place justice, I almost feel bad posting them. This place is Paradise. All the photos were taken with a 18-55mm kit lens, damn I needed a wide angle and marco lens with me!